~ Gallery - Schools ~
National School.
The early public schools in Gornal were run by the Church.
'National Schools' provided elementary education to the children of the poor and were universally coupled with Anglican religious teaching, a National School existed at Gornal in 1834 with principle Thomas Addenbrook.
In 1842, the principals were Thomas Addenbrooke, master and Frances and Maria Addenbrooke, mistresses.

Wolverhampton Chronical, April 23, 1845.

TO BUILDERS

Plans and Specifications for BUILDING SCHOOLS and a HOUSE for the Master at Gornal, near St. James's Church, may be seen any day till the 7th of May next, at the Rev. T.Theodosius's. The Trustees do not pledge themselves to accept the lowest estimate.
  April 23, 1845
National School (St James's), Lower Gornal.
Tenders for building the Schools and School House was put out to builders by the Church in 1844, by 1847 the school was built, "..the number of children attending these schools is about 350, including Day, Sunday, and Infant Schools." [Newspaper report 21 july 1847]
School House- part of the old National School opposite St. James's in disrepair.
Photo CDM 2017
Lower Gornal National School was listed in the 1851 Slaters Directory with Edward Ratcliffe, Master and Ann Hartill, Mistress, attended by aboout 290 childern.
Phoebe Moss was in charge of the Infants School.
The National School was attended by about 290 local children at this time.
In 1865 the school was listed:
St James's, Edward Ratcliff, master. Hannah Hale, mistress (National Schools).
[Jones's Mercantile Directory]
In 1882, 200 infant and junior children were on the books at commencement of the school year.
When Redhall School took over the local childrens education, the school was used by the church as a Sunday School.
The old National School was at the top end of Temple Street, near to where the Memorial Hall now stands.
The main school building was demolished to make way for the proposed new Church Hall.
The adjacent School House - the old building next to the Memorial Hall. is still standing but presently appears derelict, see picture.
~
Next to St. Peters, Upper Gornal was also a 'National School' in the 19th Century.
~